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Wake On Lan

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Has anyone gotten this configured on K2? I would like to be able to bring up machines that are offline when they need to be updated/patched, but I must be missing a part of the process, because they are not coming online. I have their Wake On Lan configured in the BIOS, and its checked for my update process, what am I missing? Thanks all!

 

 

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  • I was trying to work this out also.  What I ended up doing was creating a dummy procedure that did nothing, and then made the procedure wake on lan to run.  I know it's not a procedure-free way to do things, but it's working until I can figure out how to wake without another process.

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  • I'm battling/conquering this as we speak.

    The BIOS was the easy part as HP/DELL provide command line tools for this (HP's biosconfigutility.exe).

    Kaseya is as easy as checking the same box for any agent.

    The trick is making sure it's enabled in the Power Management settings of the NIC.

    The POWERCFG.EXE command can be run to enable this on an individual basis. However, something has to be written to call the variable of the NIC name to automate enabling this on 2000+ machines.

    That's the final piece I'm working on.

  • Dell has a command line util to enable WOL in the bios? Link please =]

    Something worth noting, some Cisco devices block the magic packet. Also I've had problems (read: never got the darnd thing to work) traversing subnets/VLANs.  And in one case, a poorly wired office there were a couple of machines that I just couldn't wake, come to find out they were behind 5 little switch/hubs (lazy person wired them i suppose)

  • My experience has been with HPs so far, but when I was looking into an HP solution I saw mention of DELL having the same sort of thing. Only looking briefly, this is the first link I found for DELL.

    www.delltechcenter.com/.../Configuring+the+BIOS+using+the+Dell+Client+Configuration+Utility+(DCCU)

    You have to create a sort-of answer file for the utility and then run the utility. It was the same way for the HP tool.

    @thirteentwenty - What method(s) have you used to actually enable WOL (Power Management) within Windows?

  • The hard way... manually (for me it's the only way to be sure atm)

  • Hope this helps some of you:

    I've just been playing around with the POWERCFG command.

    To enable WakeOnLan on the network card, I first run this on the command prompt:

    POWERCFG -DEVICEQUERY wake_armed | FIND "Ethernet" >> c:\temp\WakeOnLan.txt

    Take the result from this as a "BEFORE" state.

    I then run:

    POWERCFG -DEVICEQUERY wake_programmable | FIND "Ethernet" >> c:\temp\WakeOnLan.txt

    to get the name of the network card into a text file. Get the results of the text file into #deviceName#.

    Then run: POWERCFG -DEVICEENABLEWAKE "#deviceName#"

    This doesn't produce any output, so to make sure it has worked, you can run the first command again to get the "AFTER" state.

    This is all assuming that the network card has the word "Ethernet" in its name. You want this to be specific enough that it only finds one device, but not too specific so that it finds the device in most cases. "Network" would be a good plan B, or 2nd script to run on the failures of the first.

    S

  • Nice, but (sorry to play devils advocate here) but with out some kind of check you could actually turn WOL off.  

  • That's a different command -DEVICEDISABLEWAKE

    You can run the enable command as many times as you like - won't change a thing.

    S

  • Ah I see, sorry about that my eyes were a bit crossed... enable, disable... left, right... it all starts looking the same after 5pm for some reason

  • @thirteentwenty - I found another link for the DELL tool.

    support.us.dell.com/.../download.aspxc=us&l=en&s=gen&releaseid=R204280&formatcnt=1&libid=0&fileid=285029

  • @Simon:

    Can you further explain the "Get the results of the text file into "devicename"?

    Can these steps be configured into a single file to run?

    I'd say "network" and "ethernet" would cover at least 90%. Can both be done, or both NIC names be looked for and configured?



    [edited by: cameronpratto at 6:48 AM (GMT -7) on 11-5-2010] Wanted to direct who the reply was to.
  • And by the way, I know I have also configured several WOL agents successfully and Kaseya's option to wake a machine during setting a schedule isn't working.

  • Is there any script or agent procedure inside of Kaseya that allows the machine to be woken up without scheduling another procedure? You would think there would be a how-to or FAQ on how to enable this without so much headache.

  • I was trying to work this out also.  What I ended up doing was creating a dummy procedure that did nothing, and then made the procedure wake on lan to run.  I know it's not a procedure-free way to do things, but it's working until I can figure out how to wake without another process.

  • I have the "Desktop Policy and Migration" module and just found there's a Wake on LAN section.

    In there you can turn machines on immediately (happy to have that to save me a calling people) or set a schedule so machines turn on automatically at that time.

    Of course, I assume all this depends on at least on box being up...

  • It looks like this is "working" found that if all the machines on a particular subnet were down, and you tried to do anything WOL enabled, they won't work, I assume because of the process that needs to find the MAC address of the device in question has to be loaded on the LAN. And SeanD I ended up doing just that, making a agent process that writes a log entry about waking up the machine, and then scheduling it to have the wake if offline checked. This just seems klunky, but I doubt anything will be done about it in the future to remedy it.