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Understanding Private Remote Control

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I need to be able to remote onto a machine in a separate session whilst an existing user is already on already.

When I use the above on Windows 10 devices, I get notified that I will be forcing off an existing logged on user.

What is the difference between this and Remote control or is the behaviour different on server endpoints?

Verified Answer
  • There are two types of remote access, 1) the shared session just connects to whatever session is being displayed on the monitor of the remote machine, and 2) the private session uses Microsoft's Remote Desktop protocol under the hood to connect to the machine.

    The problem you are experiencing is due to Windows 10 licensing.  Windows 10 is only licensed for 1 console session remote or local doesn't matter.  If you have to do something while someone is logged onto the computer, you have to use scripting or CMD / Powershell.  Or you have to take over the session of the active user to do what you need to do and then give control back to the user.  There is no way arround it that I know of because this is a by-design licensing thing.

All Replies
  • There are two types of remote access, 1) the shared session just connects to whatever session is being displayed on the monitor of the remote machine, and 2) the private session uses Microsoft's Remote Desktop protocol under the hood to connect to the machine.

    The problem you are experiencing is due to Windows 10 licensing.  Windows 10 is only licensed for 1 console session remote or local doesn't matter.  If you have to do something while someone is logged onto the computer, you have to use scripting or CMD / Powershell.  Or you have to take over the session of the active user to do what you need to do and then give control back to the user.  There is no way arround it that I know of because this is a by-design licensing thing.

  • What happens on the user's end when you initiate the "Private Remote Control" is it just locks their screen.  It keeps the same login session.  Exactly like you were remote desktop'ed into that PC.  The bad thing is that you have to login as that person.  Think of "Remote Control" as screen sharing and "Private Remote Control" as remote desktop.

  • Thanks for the responses. I opened a support ticket and was told you should be able to login without affecting the existing connected user.

    Given what has just been clarified, I cannot see much use for Private Remote Control as both methods ultimately disrupts the end user.

  • From my perspective the biggest reasons for the private Remote control is when working on semi public facing devices. An example would be several years ago I was working remote on a computer that was set up in the warehouse lunch room for employees to clock in and out on.  As people would come and go some of them would see the mouse moving and freak out and try to take over and close my windows etc.  Had I had a remote access tool at the time that allowed private access I could have just connected in for private access the monitor in the lunch room would have show the computer was locked, and I could have just done what I needed to do w/o interruption.

  • Thanks again for the clarification.

    Now I see some use in this mode.