Kaseya Community

LAN Watch Can't find devices

  • I am running a LAN Watch in a subnet with a Wyse Thin Client with embedded XP.

    The LAN Watch doesn't find the device.

    It turns out that my client has about 40 of these in 15 cities. I need to deploy an agent, but need to automated.

    Has anybody experienced anything similar or have a trick to locate?

    Thanks in advance.
    Brian

    Legacy Forum Name: LAN Watch Can't find devices,
    Legacy Posted By Username: boshaughnessy
  • NEVERMIND!

    My client was "helping" me and tried unsuccessfully to install the agent on the test machine. There was a record in the database, but no agent installed on the thin client.

    Legacy Forum Name: Network Discovery,
    Legacy Posted By Username: boshaughnessy
  • boshaughnessy
    NEVERMIND!

    My client was "helping" me and tried unsuccessfully to install the agent on the test machine. There was a record in the database, but no agent installed on the thin client.


    What kind of thin clients are you working with?

    Legacy Forum Name: Network Discovery,
    Legacy Posted By Username: thirteentwenty
  • we are adding the feature to install agents via the network discovery module. Should be included in a build this week

    Jeff

    Legacy Forum Name: Network Discovery,
    Legacy Posted By Username: Jeff.Keyes
  • Jeff.Keyes
    we are adding the feature to install agents via the network discovery module. Should be included in a build this week

    Jeff


    Can you add something that will assis in traversing subnets? Please... pretty please with sugar on top... Big Smile

    Legacy Forum Name: Network Discovery,
    Legacy Posted By Username: thirteentwenty
  • Jeff.Keyes
    we are adding the feature to install agents via the network discovery module. Should be included in a build this week

    Jeff


    Very cool Jeff, looking forward to getting hands on that. Have got the module installed and working and am liking it so far I must say. Particularly liking the layout of the interface, could this be applied elsewhere maybe ? (provided it doesn't sacrifice speed, etc).

    James

    Legacy Forum Name: Network Discovery,
    Legacy Posted By Username: jameshailstone
  • - does it traverse subnets? Yes - you can define whatever range you are looking for. We (by default) limit to a 24 bit network, but you could set it up to do class A if you'd like.

    - will the UI be used for other modules? My plan is to make it so, but I've got an internal sales pitch to make that happen. What do we need? PLEASE BE VOCAL ABOUT THE USER INTERFACE (that is me "yelling" on a forum post Smile ). Tell me/us what you like / don't like / etc.

    There are internal disputes on whether
    - the org tree on the left is better than having the drop down
    - the classification on the left tree for all modules rather than just for network discovery
    - having multiple "pivots" on the navigation tree each of which further filter data rather than just using one pivot to filter data


    You get the idea.

    IF you have an opinion, please email me / call me / etc....I'd like to have more feedback to hand forward.

    Jeff

    Legacy Forum Name: Network Discovery,
    Legacy Posted By Username: Jeff.Keyes
  • Jeff.Keyes
    - but you could set it up to do class A if you'd like.


    How can I set it to scan a class A subnet? I have a new client with 500 machines scattered out in a class A subnet. Scanning 2048 address at a time does not seem too appealing to me.

    Legacy Forum Name: Network Discovery,
    Legacy Posted By Username: SSwingley
  • Class A and the like.

    It isn't pretty, but I will generally use "Superscan 3" from Foundstone to just pingscan/nameresolve gigantic ranges. Then, once I've found some representative machines in various sub-ranges, manually push (psexec from CMD line) kcssetup to one machine per range, and set that machine up as a LAN Watch.

    It isn't pretty, and it's a manual process, but it does end up working out OK. And, since it's a "do it once and it's done" process, having it be manual isn't the end of the world.

    Legacy Forum Name: Network Discovery,
    Legacy Posted By Username: Matthew Bartels
  • I may be a bit new to the "scanning class 'A' networks" thing...but what do you need differently that we don't offer now?

    You can set up ranges, exclusions, etc.

    Legacy Forum Name: Network Discovery,
    Legacy Posted By Username: Jeff.Keyes
  • Well, take this example:

    I have a network: 10.20.27.0/24
    It has WAN links (point to point T1) that are simply routed to other 10.x.x.x networks, like say 10.140.6.0/24 and 10.13.32.0/24

    (Let's assume the numbering scheme is based on street address; therefore networks are easily identifiable but non-contiguous).

    So ideally I want to do an initial scan on 10.0.0.1 to 10.255.255.0 to make sure I don't miss any of these networks. Later, I'm OK with only scanning the ones I "know about".

    The brute-force way is as discussed, and is something that LAN Watch and KDiscovery aren't happy with; too many addresses! A simple ping scanner can brute-force its way across all of that address space in a matter of hours, and once it shows there's "nothing there" for most of the space, you can ignore it except where you've found IP addresses that respond.

    A much cooler (and smarter) way would be to interrogate the routing protocols on everything that gets discovered and ask "what networks do you know about". Something like EIGRP on Cisco routers; jump from one place to another using information each node has on just its neighbors, and put together a "master" routing table to decide what IP addresses to do SNMP/NMAP scans on.

    What it comes down to is this: KDiscovery and LAN Watch both try to do a *lot* with the IP range you give them. It would be interesting to have a two-tiered mode where you tell it "light scanning first, then dig into anything you find that's pingable later"

    Legacy Forum Name: Network Discovery,
    Legacy Posted By Username: Matthew Bartels
  • The scanning we do in KND is 3 parts
    1. A light weight ping scan (using nmap) on whatever range you give it

    On discovered devices
    2. A deeper port scan
    3. An SNMP walk attempt (using whatever credentials we have)

    The ping scan can be configured to span ranges, etc....its just something that must be configured.

    We don't really do anything to make that process simpler today other than (as you say) brute force looking for all addresses in that range.

    I really like the idea of interrogating the routing tables...but i thought that would require some kind of security.

    Assuming the devices have agents on them, we could do some really interesting things..but then...they already have agents on them.... Smile


    Jeff

    Legacy Forum Name: Network Discovery,
    Legacy Posted By Username: Jeff.Keyes
  • Hi ,

    how can i set up ranges in the collector ?

    Default now is scan his local subnet , how can i add an extra subnet ?

    regards,
    Patrick

    Legacy Forum Name: Network Discovery,
    Legacy Posted By Username: PatrickAndrea
  • So it's pretty good at discovering devices but then:

    - It has a lot of difficulty identifying the device (
    - Can't figure out how to scan other subnets
    - Graphing for interface stats is nice but there is a vast amount of other data that effectively gets ignored
    - What is the roadmap for KDiscovery - will it integrate from a reporting perspective?

    Legacy Forum Name: Network Discovery,
    Legacy Posted By Username: teamnet
  • They are at 1.3.6.1.2.1.4.21
    If you know the comm string, and if the MIB supports it (of course, one's mileage will vary on this score) then you can retrieve routing from SNMP devices, no agent or other authentication required!

    -Matt

    Jeff.Keyes
    The scanning we do in KND is 3 parts
    1. A light weight ping scan (using nmap) on whatever range you give it

    On discovered devices
    2. A deeper port scan
    3. An SNMP walk attempt (using whatever credentials we have)

    The ping scan can be configured to span ranges, etc....its just something that must be configured.

    We don't really do anything to make that process simpler today other than (as you say) brute force looking for all addresses in that range.

    I really like the idea of interrogating the routing tables...but i thought that would require some kind of security.

    Assuming the devices have agents on them, we could do some really interesting things..but then...they already have agents on them.... Smile


    Jeff


    Legacy Forum Name: Network Discovery,
    Legacy Posted By Username: Matthew Bartels