Kaseya Community

Validate Windows XP Product Key without WGA

  • Hi All,

    First post to the forums having recently jumped on the good ship Kaseya for my MSP business.....

    Scenario: I have a number of small consultancy engagements where a client wants me to come in and conduct site assessment and leave them with findings report/recommendations etc.

    One thing I would like to be able to do is to validate if they have a genuine copy of Windows XP installed. However, I don't want to install WGA because if they haven't and I leave them with x amount of PC's all suddenly nagging them etc. they won't thank me for it (Even though it is they who would be in the wrong)

    I'm not advocating dodgy licenses but I often see it in clients that have used less reputable suppliers in the past. If they are on contract with me then I work to replace as necessary but these new enagements will specifically be to assess and report findings rather than a longer term goal.

    Offers and suggestions welcome.

    In the past I've been left with googling the last 5 characters of the product key to see if it's a common fake key listed on the internet but that is by no way bulletproof.

    Legacy Forum Name: Validate Windows XP Product Key without WGA,
    Legacy Posted By Username: SteveWebster
  • Check here:



    http://community.kaseya.com/xsp/f/28/t/6668.aspx



    This does use the wgadiag tool but I believe it will bypass the nags. Someone can correct me if I am wrong.

    Legacy Forum Name: How-To,
    Legacy Posted By Username: cnwicsurrett
  • I have found in the past - if the client has previously employed a "dodgy" support person, they generally use the same licence key for their installs. In Kaseya, if you go to Audit --> SW Licences ... and click on a machine, any duplicate licences will appear in red and show which machines are affected. Having said that - HP OEMs tend to report the same pre-installed licence, also their MS Office open licence will report the same. Hope this helps. Smile

    Legacy Forum Name: How-To,
    Legacy Posted By Username: carey-pccare
  • Carey - Not necessarily true... If that company had IT Personnel that employed the Volume License way of installing Windows (Legitimately I might add, Open license or otherwise) every machine could have the same key and still be legit.

    Also, Every big box OEM company has a special method to Bypass the Activation (Dell, HP, Lenovo, Acer, etc). There is a special BIOS file that when used in conjunction with a certain Windows key does not require it to be activated, it just activates itself. Thus if your machines are, like Carey said, OEM type machines they would also report the same key, unless they've been reinstalled using non-oem disks.

    It's not always a good move to just base off of Product Keys.

    Legacy Forum Name: How-To,
    Legacy Posted By Username: Charles.IN
  • Good point Charles. I think Kaseya is a good place to start with checking for duplicate licensing just to get a heads-up, but at the end of the day, it's the physical COA that Microsoft will be looking for when they come knocking, (regardless of whether a different key is installed).

    You won't be able to roll out certain patches until the Genuine Advantage tool is run anyway.

    (I would hate to count the number of hours I have spent in server rooms, sorting and labelling boxes of disks, MS Office licences, and old crap that goes back to 3 networks ago etc.)

    Legacy Forum Name: How-To,
    Legacy Posted By Username: carey-pccare
  • Charles.IN
    Carey - Not necessarily true... If that company had IT Personnel that employed the Volume License way of installing Windows (Legitimately I might add, Open license or otherwise) every machine could have the same key and still be legit.

    Also, Every big box OEM company has a special method to Bypass the Activation (Dell, HP, Lenovo, Acer, etc). There is a special BIOS file that when used in conjunction with a certain Windows key does not require it to be activated, it just activates itself. Thus if your machines are, like Carey said, OEM type machines they would also report the same key, unless they've been reinstalled using non-oem disks.

    It's not always a good move to just base off of Product Keys.


    This is almost accurate. In the case of the OEM keys, it combines a universal key from the install media with a unique key in the BIOS. Then it actually activates against servers on the Internet hosted by Dell, HP, etc. They actually do activate, just not with Microsoft.

    I know this because I have had to work with Microsoft and Dell on an activation issue before for this type of key.

    Legacy Forum Name: How-To,
    Legacy Posted By Username: far182