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Kaseya Agent installed on my work PC, should I be worried?

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Hello,

The Kaseya Agent was recently installed on our work PC's with no information given to us from the IT department.

After a little Googling and browsing these forums, I'm quite worried that the Kaseya Agent could be used to snoop or spy on myself and my colleagues.

I'm sure our employers are covered to do this in the contracts, but still a little notice would have been nice.

So, can Kaseya spy on what you are doing?

Sam

Verified Answer
  • Sam,

    Out of the box, Kaseya is not designed to spy on machines.  It's designed primarily for monitoring, patching, automation and remote control; the latter of which is typically used in a support-type scenario, where you call the IT department, and they connect to your machine to figure out what the issue is, and disconnect shortly thereafter.

    Understand though that Kaseya is a very powerful tool as well, which gives the Kaseya administrator full access to the machine.  System Administrators adhere to a code of ethics in this regard... just because we can doesn't mean that we will.  Your corporate policies also dictate what we can and cannot do.  As with any profession, there are always a few "bad apples" who do things they shouldn't, but they're absolutely the exception and not the rule.

    We're also bound by our employers to do what they ask as well.  Only twice have I been asked to "monitor" someone's activity, and I assure you that it's not like an evil wizard peering into a crystal ball where management and I watch every keystroke, mouse click and webpage while cackling nefariously.  Upon request, I usually wind up scheduling periodic screenshots (pictures of the screen) to be taken every 1-5 minutes, then provide management the pictures after their requested monitoring period has ended.  Muahaha?

    Bottom line here is this: it's your employer's computer, not yours (and your corporate policy will likely reflect this), and your employer likely has complete rights to do whatever they would like monitoring-wise on your machine... but in practice, this is exceedingly rare, and in my experience, only used in "HR situations" where someone is "up to no good" or simply "slacking off" to an extent where hard evidence of such is needed beyond what managers could typically glean from whatever performance metrics that an employee is judged by.

    I wouldn't worry about it... we're all a very busy lot, and whether we're wearing the System Administrator hat, the Kaseya Administrator hat, the Project Engineer hat, or any other number of hats, I assure you that we don't have time to watch users look at pictures of kittens anyway Smile

  • Sam, I'm going to go one step towards the "Cynical" side here, and while I agree 100% with everything Brian Dagan has said, I'll add this thought:

    If your employer were spying on you, Kaseya is not the tool that anyone would suggest they use.  I'm willing to go so far as to say that iIf spying/snooping/etc. were their main goal, and they went to any MSP represented here in these forums, none of us would tell them in good conscience that Kaseya is the right platform for that.  I'd be willing to bet that a majority would say "If it's spying you want, then it's SpectorCNE (or whatever it's called now) that will get the job done."

    Anyone using Kaseya for spying that even goes so far as to leave the icon visible, and not re-branded, is incompetent and should not be trusted to do the job!

    The fact that you were able to quickly and easily identify the toolset that was installed on your PC, join the forum to discuss it, and ask the question of us, means that either they aren't spying, or that they're *really* bad at it :)

    But I applaud your efforts - even by doing this you have shown yourself to be in the 90th percentile of end-users in terms of savvy.  Good for you, keep your management team honest :)

    -Matt

    P.S. If your management have also installed SpectorCNE, you probably don't know, and might not be able to prove it even if they did!  It is a great product for the purpose it is made to fill.

    P.P.S.  Also - for simple "monitoring", I have definitely done the same thing described by Brian Dagan - setup a periodic "screenshot" and provide it to management.  It is almost always either for a) a stolen machine, where we get the theif's facebook identity from the screenshot and provide it to the police, who then do what police do, or b) when an employee is already "known" to be ignoring/circumventing/breaking company policy, and the employer just needs a printout with a time/date stamp for human resources purposes.

    P.P.S.  Sorry for all the extra info here - but this is a potential firestorm topic actually - any customer that asks for this, is in turn asked for their Acceptable Use Policy that all of their employees have acknowledged and/or signed.  If they don't have a "Company computers and all activity on them may be monitored at the company's discretion without notice" clause, we always strongly recommend that they do that before implementing activity monitoring.  It's an important CYA for us and for them!  But it sounds like your employer may have already done that.

  • Thanks for the help, I can sleep a little easier now. :)

    Sam

All Replies
  • Sam,

    Out of the box, Kaseya is not designed to spy on machines.  It's designed primarily for monitoring, patching, automation and remote control; the latter of which is typically used in a support-type scenario, where you call the IT department, and they connect to your machine to figure out what the issue is, and disconnect shortly thereafter.

    Understand though that Kaseya is a very powerful tool as well, which gives the Kaseya administrator full access to the machine.  System Administrators adhere to a code of ethics in this regard... just because we can doesn't mean that we will.  Your corporate policies also dictate what we can and cannot do.  As with any profession, there are always a few "bad apples" who do things they shouldn't, but they're absolutely the exception and not the rule.

    We're also bound by our employers to do what they ask as well.  Only twice have I been asked to "monitor" someone's activity, and I assure you that it's not like an evil wizard peering into a crystal ball where management and I watch every keystroke, mouse click and webpage while cackling nefariously.  Upon request, I usually wind up scheduling periodic screenshots (pictures of the screen) to be taken every 1-5 minutes, then provide management the pictures after their requested monitoring period has ended.  Muahaha?

    Bottom line here is this: it's your employer's computer, not yours (and your corporate policy will likely reflect this), and your employer likely has complete rights to do whatever they would like monitoring-wise on your machine... but in practice, this is exceedingly rare, and in my experience, only used in "HR situations" where someone is "up to no good" or simply "slacking off" to an extent where hard evidence of such is needed beyond what managers could typically glean from whatever performance metrics that an employee is judged by.

    I wouldn't worry about it... we're all a very busy lot, and whether we're wearing the System Administrator hat, the Kaseya Administrator hat, the Project Engineer hat, or any other number of hats, I assure you that we don't have time to watch users look at pictures of kittens anyway Smile

  • Sam, I'm going to go one step towards the "Cynical" side here, and while I agree 100% with everything Brian Dagan has said, I'll add this thought:

    If your employer were spying on you, Kaseya is not the tool that anyone would suggest they use.  I'm willing to go so far as to say that iIf spying/snooping/etc. were their main goal, and they went to any MSP represented here in these forums, none of us would tell them in good conscience that Kaseya is the right platform for that.  I'd be willing to bet that a majority would say "If it's spying you want, then it's SpectorCNE (or whatever it's called now) that will get the job done."

    Anyone using Kaseya for spying that even goes so far as to leave the icon visible, and not re-branded, is incompetent and should not be trusted to do the job!

    The fact that you were able to quickly and easily identify the toolset that was installed on your PC, join the forum to discuss it, and ask the question of us, means that either they aren't spying, or that they're *really* bad at it :)

    But I applaud your efforts - even by doing this you have shown yourself to be in the 90th percentile of end-users in terms of savvy.  Good for you, keep your management team honest :)

    -Matt

    P.S. If your management have also installed SpectorCNE, you probably don't know, and might not be able to prove it even if they did!  It is a great product for the purpose it is made to fill.

    P.P.S.  Also - for simple "monitoring", I have definitely done the same thing described by Brian Dagan - setup a periodic "screenshot" and provide it to management.  It is almost always either for a) a stolen machine, where we get the theif's facebook identity from the screenshot and provide it to the police, who then do what police do, or b) when an employee is already "known" to be ignoring/circumventing/breaking company policy, and the employer just needs a printout with a time/date stamp for human resources purposes.

    P.P.S.  Sorry for all the extra info here - but this is a potential firestorm topic actually - any customer that asks for this, is in turn asked for their Acceptable Use Policy that all of their employees have acknowledged and/or signed.  If they don't have a "Company computers and all activity on them may be monitored at the company's discretion without notice" clause, we always strongly recommend that they do that before implementing activity monitoring.  It's an important CYA for us and for them!  But it sounds like your employer may have already done that.

  • Thanks for the help, I can sleep a little easier now. :)

    Sam

  • Wow... this is just what our team was pondering about last evening.

    What if an IT professional misuses the access given to him by this technology!!

    Interestingly, this is one of the common question that comes up when we speak to our potential clients.

    Thanks for the clarity and support :)