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Has Anyone Successfully Built an IIS View for Server 2008?

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Good Morning Everyone,

I'm trying to build a view for IIS servers running Server 2008 R2.  I can't seem to find anything to filter by.

The service runs as svchost.exe -k iissvcs so I can't filter by the .exe that runs the service.
I tried to filter by iisreset.exe, but that is apparently installed by default.
I tried to filter by InetMgr.exe, but that also appears to be installed/copied to the server by default.

I can't see how to filter a view by an existing service.
I can't see how to filter by an installed Role on Server 2008.

Has anyone successfully built an IIS view for Server 2008?  If so, could you please share the view, or how you built it?

Thank you,
Matt

Verified Answer
  • Hi Matt,

    We have an IIS montor set, which is applied to all of our SBS machines. Just select your IIS monitor set in the "Only show machines with monitorset assigned" option in the view, then set the OS - You may want only IIS6 machines for example.

    Yes, it's a simple way to do it, and while you don't get a live status on the services, it's good enough to apply to a policy to attach event sets, or KSDU policy if you're using that. The trick with the view is to apply the monitor set using a different policy such as a base server or base sbs policy.

    Is this the type of view you want?

    Dan

All Replies
  • I know this is a kludge, but I use a scheduled Agent Procedure to determine whether w3svc is running.  If it is, I update an "Automatic_Monitoring-Detected*" Custom Field with IIS (among other services that are detected in series).  I then build up views based on the contents of the Custom Field containing *IIS*:

    Logically, this could be a problem if IIS doesn't happen to be running at the time my daily Automatic Monitoring check script runs, but the odds are very low.

    This same approach seems to help for other services that run off of svchost.exe (like DHCP and DNS), because each of those also has a discrete service short name that's not just svchost.exe.

    Hope this helps!

  • I like brian's approach, one more thing you could do is run a shell command and check on the results. Something like:

    net start | find /i "webclient"

    then pipe the output to a txt file and check for file content. :-) hope this helps you.

  • Filter by your IIS Monitor set and OS

    Dan

  • Siax-Dan - This sounds like the easiest solution, only how do you filter a policy this way?  As far as I know, you have to build a view to use with a Policy.  

    Thanks,

    Matt

  • I used script that searches registry key to get the IIS versions and write the version in custom column to create view. That is one part of the script that we use to identify other roles like Exchange, SQL, Citrix, Blackberry etc..

  • Hi Matt,

    We have an IIS montor set, which is applied to all of our SBS machines. Just select your IIS monitor set in the "Only show machines with monitorset assigned" option in the view, then set the OS - You may want only IIS6 machines for example.

    Yes, it's a simple way to do it, and while you don't get a live status on the services, it's good enough to apply to a policy to attach event sets, or KSDU policy if you're using that. The trick with the view is to apply the monitor set using a different policy such as a base server or base sbs policy.

    Is this the type of view you want?

    Dan

  • That is what worked for me!  Thanks siax-dan!

  • Brian Dagan

    I know this is a kludge, but I use a scheduled Agent Procedure to determine whether w3svc is running.  If it is, I update an "Automatic_Monitoring-Detected*" Custom Field with IIS (among other services that are detected in series).  I then build up views based on the contents of the Custom Field containing *IIS*:

    Logically, this could be a problem if IIS doesn't happen to be running at the time my daily Automatic Monitoring check script runs, but the odds are very low.

    This same approach seems to help for other services that run off of svchost.exe (like DHCP and DNS), because each of those also has a discrete service short name that's not just svchost.exe.

    Hope this helps!

    If you ever wanted to incorporate this view into a policy I would say Brian Dagan way would work the best and as he mentioned if you wrote a "Discovery" procedure that can check if certain registry keys, services and files in specific file paths exist allowing you to do so much more. I use this same method to detect most of the roles of servers so that I can automatically assign monitoring sets to them.